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Clinical Programs

Clinical legal education is a critical component of law school curricula, and Denver Law has led the way for over 125 years. We founded the first legal aid dispensary in the country in 1904 and have continued to provide innovative, hands-on legal education to our students ever since.

Our clinical programs provide opportunities to engage in the practice of law during school while empowering underrepresented individuals and communities. Denver Law currently has six in-house student law office clinics where student-attorneys can learn to become highly competent and ethical lawyers through faculty supervision and real-life client representation.

In addition, we are fortunate to have three additional clinics under our roof, the Low Income Tax Payer Clinic, the Veterans Advocacy Project and the Tribal Wills Project. Each of these programs provides legal assistance and representation to populations that don't often have access to representation, all while giving students specialized, hands-on experience that will help them make an immediate, valuable impact in their chosen fields.  

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Additional Clinics & Student Legal Projects

In addition to the six student legal office clinics, Denver Law provides legal assistance through three other innovative programs that are dedicated to the public good: 

  • The Low Income Taxpayer Clinic represents low-income taxpayers before the IRS in audit, appeals, collections and federal tax litigation.
  • The Veterans Advocacy Project works primarily on VA disability benefit compensation cases and on discharge upgrade cases. 
  • The Tribal Wills Project allows law students to spend a week drafting much-needed wills, medical powers of attorney, living wills and burial instructions for tribal members.

#7

clinical training

U.S. News & World Report

1st

student law clinic in the nation

opened in 1904

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clinical programs

"Participating in the Clinical Program is extraordinarily useful. To have that experiential learning alongside that classroom experience really forces you to take what you learned in the classroom and make it into being a competent lawyer." Ellen Giarratana, JD '16

Student Law Office

When it opened as a “legal aid dispensary” in 1904, our clinic was the first in the country to offer law students academic credit for representing poor persons. Today, the Student Law Office (SLO) strives to create an educational atmosphere in which law students can refine their lawyering skills while providing quality representation to indigent and underserved clients. The lawyering skills emphasized in this program include the development of effective client relationships; issue-identification; factual and legal research and analysis; oral advocacy, communication and client advocacy in judicial and administrative settings and negotiation. Also emphasized are the use of appropriate office management techniques that ensure the efficient, ethical handling of client cases as well as strategic planning project management and understanding business concepts and community development goals.

As a working law firm, the SLO provides representation to clients in civil, criminal, civil rights, environmental, and community economic development matters referred by the courts, local agencies, community partners and individuals. Faculty supervisors advise and monitor cases and projects through closure, but in the SLO the students have the primary responsibility for their clients.

  • History

    In 1904, Dean Lucius W. Hoyt had the foresight and vision to recognize that poor and underserved communities need legal help, and that law students could provide that help while simultaneously learning important practice skills. Thus, opened as a “legal aid dispensary” in 1904, the University of Denver was the first in the country to offer law students academic credit for representing poor persons. Today, the Clinical Programs strive to create an educational atmosphere in which law students can refine their lawyering skills while providing quality representation to indigent clients.

    While considered unusual in 1904, clinical legal education is now a critical part of all law schools’ curricula. Today, the University of Denver’s Clinical Programs has six in-house clinics, including criminal defense, civil litigation, civil rights, community economic development, environmental law and immigration law and policy.

    This range of clinical offerings provides students opportunities to learn many different skills including pretrial and trial and transactional. Students have the opportunity to interview and counsel clients, develop case theory, investigate and engage in discovery, negotiate with adversaries, mediate settlements and engage in the trial of disputed matters and draft contracts and bylaws, article of incorporation, etc. They learn legal ethics and practice in a range of areas including issues of confidentiality and conflict of interest. The Clinical Programs emphasizes case management skills, enabling students to handle their cases effectively and efficiently. Finally, our students develop sensitivity to and empathy for the plight of underserved clients.

  • Clinical Teaching Fellowship

    Denver Law offers a Clinical Teaching Fellowship Program, which offers attorneys the opportunity to gain extensive practice in law school clinical teaching. The Fellows are enrolled in a three-year program during which they are in residence at one of the Denver Law’s six in-house clinics.

    Under the supervision of experienced clinical faculty, Fellows will gain extensive practice in law school clinical teaching including direct supervision of J.D. students, first as co-supervisors with clinic faculty and then on their own. Fellows assist in teaching clinic seminars and perform work on their own cases or other legal matters. Additionally, Fellows will also learn about academic legal scholarship and, with the assistance of a faculty mentor, produce publishable-quality scholarship during their residence. It is the explicit goal of the fellowship to prepare Fellows for a career in clinical legal education.

    Apply for a Graduate Fellowship

FAQs - Student Law Office

  • What are the benefits of participating in the Student Law Office (SLO)?

    Clinical legal education is a critical part of all law schools’ curricula. Today, the University of Denver’s Student Law Office (SLO) has five in-house clinics including criminal defense, civil litigation, civil rights, community economic development, and environmental law. This range of clinical offerings provides students opportunities to learn different skills including pretrial, trial, and transactional. Students have the opportunity to interview and counsel clients, develop case theory, investigate and engage in discovery, negotiate with adversaries, mediate settlements and engage in the trial of disputed matters, draft contracts and bylaws, article of incorporation, etc. They learn legal ethics and practice in a range of areas including issues of confidentiality and conflict of interest. The SLO emphasizes case management skills, enabling students to handle their cases effectively and efficiently. Finally, our students develop sensitivity to and empathy for the plight of underserved clients.

  • When can I apply for a position in a clinic?

    Every Fall and Spring the Student Law Office (SLO) hosts a recruitment fair in the Forum. The fair provides a platform for law students to talk to the clinic faculty, staff and current SLO students about the clinical programs. The Student Law Office also sponsors a lunchtime information session where faculty describe the work and expectations of each clinic.

    The SLO has an online application process which usually starts within a few days of the recruitment fair and can be accessed by clicking the link below.

    Click here to Apply for a Clinic 

    Note: Registration for the Civil Rights Clinic, the Environmental Clinic, and the Community Economic Development Clinic occur only in the Spring of each year, for the following Fall, as they are year-long clinics. The Criminal Defense and Civil Litigation Clinics are semester-long clinics.

    Important Dates:
    Online Application Dates - Monday, March 18, 2019, 9:00 a.m. until Sunday, March 24, 2019, 11:59 p.m.
    Clinical Programs Student Panel - Tuesday, March 19, 2019, 12:00-1:00 p.m. (Room 190)
    Clinical Programs Recruitment Fair for Fall 2019 - Wednesday, March 20, 2019, 11:00-1:00 p.m. (Law Forum)
    Clinical Programs Faculty Info Session - Thursday, March 21, 2019, 12:00-1:00 p.m. (Room 190)

    Class times for each clinic, Fall 2018
    Criminal Defense: M/TH from 12:50 pm- 2:30 pm
    Civil Litigation: W from 1:15 – 3:45 pm
    Civil Rights: M/W from 10:30 am-11:45 pm
    Community Economic Development: T from 4:15 pm-6:45 pm
    Environmental Law: T/R from 2:45 pm-4:00 pm
    Immigration Law & Policy: M/W from 12:50 pm-2:30 pm

  • What is the application process?

    Every Fall and Spring semester the Student Law Office hosts the Clinical Recruitment Fair. In an informal setting in the forum, the fair provides a platform for law students to talk to the clinic faculty, staff and current clinical students about the clinic’s offerings. The Student Information Session is a lunchtime gathering held in a classroom. The clinic faculty talk about their clinical offerings and what the students can expect if they participate in a particular clinic. Students have the opportunity to ask the faculty questions during the session. Within a few days of the recruitment fair and information session, the online clinical application process starts. Students have one week to apply to the clinical programs. Students can apply to two clinics: one first choice option and one second choice option.

    Note: Registration for the Civil Rights Clinic, the Environmental Clinic, and the Community Economic Development Clinic occur only in the Spring of each year, for the following Fall, as they are year-long clinics. The Criminal Defense and Civil Litigation Clinics are semester-long clinics.

     Important Dates:
    Online Application Dates - Monday, March 18, 2019, 9:00 a.m. until Sunday, March 24, 2019, 11:59 p.m.
    Clinical Programs Student Panel - Tuesday, March 19, 2019, 12:00-1:00 p.m. (Room 190)
    Clinical Programs Recruitment Fair for Fall 2019 - Wednesday, March 20, 2019, 11:00-1:00 p.m. (Law Forum)
    Clinical Programs Faculty Info Session - Thursday, March 21, 2019, 12:00-1:00 p.m. (Room 190)

    Class times for each clinic, Fall 2018
    Criminal Defense T/R 12:30-2:30 pm
    Civil Litigation W – 1:15 – 3:45 pm
    Civil Rights M/W 10:30-11:45 am
    Community Economic Development T 4:30-7:00 pm
    Environmental Law T/R 1:15-2:30 pm
    Immigration M/R 12:50-2:30 pm

    Apply for a Clinic

  • What time commitment will be required of me if I decide to join the SLO clinics?

    You can expect to spend a minimum of 25 hours per week working on SLO matters (including casework, supervision, classes and preparation). The exact amount of time will vary from week to week, and may be substantially more than 25 hours in some weeks. It is a good idea to plan the rest of your life with these obligations in mind.

  • Will I receive credit for participating in a clinic?

    Semester-long clinic credits:

    Criminal Defense – 9 total credits: 3 in-class and 6 out-of-class
    Civil Litigation – 9 total credits: 4 in-class and 5 out-of-class
    Immigration Law and Policy – 9 total credits: 4 in-class and 5 out-of-class

    Year-long clinic credits:

    Civil Rights – 16 total credits: 8 in-class and 8 out-of-class
    Community Economic Development – 12 total credits: 6 in-class and 6 out-of-class
    Environmental Law – 12 total credits: 6 in-class and 6 out-of-class

  • How do I know which clinic is right for me?

    Every semester the Clinical Programs hold a fair as well as a student information session. During the fair students are welcome to talk directly to the clinical faculty and current clinical students about their individual clinics and clinical experiences.

  • Will I be asked to leave the program if I don't win my cases?

    No. Rather than focusing on your wins or losses, the SLO instead focuses on your interactions with clients and your ability to meet their legal needs.

  • What is the grade requirement for participating in the SLO?

    Students must certify they have a GPA which is equal to or greater than 2.3 in order to participate in the SLO.

  • I'm a part-time student. Do I qualify for a position in the SLO clinics?

    Students must complete 30 academic credit hours to be eligible to participate in the SLO. Full-time and part-time students who have completed the 30 academic credit hour requirement are encouraged to apply for the clinical programs. However, to participate in the clinic, the SLO students are required to attend the clinic classes and attend all scheduled court dates.

  • Does the clinic satisfy the Public Service Requirement?

    There are a variety of ways to satisfy the Public Service Requirement. If you have completed a minimum of 30 academic credit hours, you may satisfy the PSR in any of the following ways:

    • A Sturm College of Law student law clinic under the auspices of the SLO. 
    • An Externship for credit at a government agency; a judicial agency; a nonprofit (501©(3)) organization; or in a private law firm doing 50 hours of pro bono work under the auspices of the Legal Externship Office.
    • The Rocky Mountain Children’s Law Center Child Advocacy Practicum associated with the Legal Externship Office
    • An approved Public Interest Practicum for either zero or one credit under the auspices of the Public Interest Office.
    • pre-approved Sturm College of Law course which has a practical public service component (current pre-approved courses are Poverty and Low Wage Work In America, Street Law, the Graduate Tax Program’s Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic, Trial Practice III: Mentor’s Practicum, the International Criminal Law Practicum, Wills Lab, and the Probate Practicum).

     

  • Can I participate in the SLO and take an externship at the same time?

    As a student attorney, you will be required to abide by the professional responsibility rules that govern all practicing lawyers. Given the intensive time commitment of the clinic as well as the potential for ethical conflicts of interest, students are not allowed to participate in a clinic and an internship, externship or any other experiential advantage course including practicums, labs or any other client work simultaneously.

  • Can I work and participate in the SLO at the same time?

    As a new student attorney you will be asked to abide by all of the ethical rules that would apply as if you were a practicing lawyer. We know that some of you will be working while also taking the clinic. While we generally discourage this, given the intensive time commitment of the clinic, we are aware that some of you will work. If you are working, we will need to disclose your clinic work to your employer and they will need to do a conflict check. If a conflict arises, there is a presumption that the conflict will be resolved to the benefit of the clinic client. Thus, there is a risk that you may have to withdraw from the clinic.

  • I’m a 1L and want to participate in the SLO during my second semester, is this possible?

    Students must complete 30 academic credit hours to be eligible to participate in the SLO.

  • Which clinics meet the experiential learning requirement for earning a certificate?

    Participation in the following clinics meets the experiential learning requirement for earning a certificate in the corresponding area of law:

    Community Economic Development Clinic – Corporate & Commercial Law
    Criminal Defense Clinic – Constitutional Rights & Remedies
    Civil Rights Clinic – Constitutional Rights & Remedies
    Civil Litigation Clinic (w/ emphasis on employment law) – Workplace Law
    Environmental Law Clinic – Environmental & Natural Resources Law

  • Additional questions? Contact us.

    If you have additional questions that have not been answered on this page, please do not hesitate to call the Student Law Office at 303.871.6150 or send us an email.

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Student Law Office Newsletters

  • Fall 2018

    A Banner Year for the Clinical Programs at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law

    Greetings from the Clinical Programs at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law! It has been an incredible year for our students and faculty members at Denver Law. We are thrilled to announce the promotions of clinicians Kevin Lynch and Lindsey Webb to the rank of Associate Professor with Tenure, and Christopher Lasch to the rank of Professor. We also are excited to welcome Wyatt Sassman to the Environmental Law Clinic and Kristen Uhl Hulse to the Legal Externship Program. This fall we welcomed a new class of clinical fellows and launched the new Immigration Law and Policy Clinic (ILPC), which focuses on representing detained clients who cannot afford counsel. Other highlights include the extraordinary successes of the Civil Rights Clinic, which has won meaningful relief for a Muslim prisoner under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, the Low Income Taxpayer Clinic, which has served more than 90 clients so far this fall, and the ILPC, in which every student worked on a team that won bond and had clients released from detention. These achievements and innovations apparently inspired Professor Lasch to join the co-director photoshoot!


    New Leadership for Denver Law's Clinical Programs

    Professors Tammy Kuennen and Robin Walker Sterling are now serving as co-directors of DU's Clinical Programs. Their official titles are Ronald V. Yegge Clinical Co-Directors, in recognition of Ronald Yegge and his contributions to the law school's Clinical Programs.

    clinical directors

     


    A Rise in Rankings for Denver Law

    The University of Denver Sturm College of Law Clinical Programs moved up five spots in the U.S. News & World Report 2018–2019 law school rankings and is now ranked 8th in the country. This marks the eighth consecutive year that the clinical programs have been ranked among the top 20 in the nation.


    Sturm College of Law Receives Gift from Arnold & Porter Foundation 

    A recent $687,000 gift from the Arnold & Porter Foundation to the University of Denver will create two new endowed scholarships at the Sturm College of Law for outstanding students with a demonstrated commitment to civil liberties and civil rights. The gift also will support a strategic litigation fund designed to advance the nationally recognized work of the law school’s Civil Rights Clinic. Learn more.


    Clinic Welcomes New Fellows

    Join us in welcoming the new class of Clinical Teaching Fellows at Denver Law (l-r): Danielle Jefferis, who has been serving as a Visiting Assistant Professor in our Civil Rights Clinic; Katherine Wallat, who was recently a Clinical Teaching Fellow and Supervising Attorney in Georgetown Law’s Community Justice Project; Sarah Matsumoto, an environmental lawyer from Eugene, Oregon; and Christina Brown, who recently served as a Deputy State Public Defender in Fort Collins, Colo.

    new fellows 2018

     


    Denver Law Establishes New Immigration Law & Policy Clinic

    The newly established Immigration Law and Policy Clinic (ILPC) provides legal services at the intersection of criminal and immigration law. ILPC students participate in immigration removal cases and explore systemic problems in the immigration enforcement system such as racial and economic bias, law enforcement accountability, hyper-incarceration and access to justice. More from the Immigration Law & Policy Clinic.


     Civil Litigation Clinic Fights for Wage Theft Victims

    Students in the Civil Litigation Clinic learned that community solidarity and political action are invaluable tools to help clients solve problems. Students collaborated with the Direct Action Team, a grass roots group of volunteers in the Denver community committed to fighting wage theft, which takes “direct action” in the form of confronting employers who refuse to pay wages. More from the Civil Litigation Clinic.


    More Wins for the Civil Rights Clinic

    The Civil Rights Clinic reached a tentative settlement agreement in a case brought on behalf of a transgender individual confined in the Colorado Department of Corrections, and also tried a case in federal court brought on behalf of a federal prisoner challenging the Federal Bureau of Prisons’ infringement of his religious rights. More from the Civil Rights Clinic.


    Gearing up for "Trial Season" in the Criminal Defense Clinic 

    In Colorado, misdemeanor and municipal cases are jury triable, so the fall 2018 CDC class is gearing up for what their professors call the “trial season,” when the clinic has several trials scheduled each week through the end of the semester.
    More from the Criminal Defense Clinic.


    New Professor and Fellow for the Environmental Law Clinic 

    The Environmental Law Clinic (ELC) is representing a coalition of environmental groups challenging the proposed Windy Gap Firming Project, which poses risks to Colorado's Grand Lake. The ELC also welcomed two new faculty members: Wyatt Sassman and Sarah Matsumoto. More from the Environmental Law Clinic.

    ELC fellow professor

     


    Legal Externship Program Tops 500 Placements

    Students in the Legal Externship Program collectively devoted close to 120,000 hours in the field this past year. The program hosted 520 externships completed by 386 students and partnered with over 300 supervisors. This past summer, the program welcomed Assistant Professor of the Practice of Law Kristen Uhl Hulse as a full-time permanent faculty member to the externship team. More from the Legal Externship Program.


    Low Income Taxpayer Clinic Reaches Settlements with IRS

    The students in the Low Income Taxpayer Clinic (LITC) have continued to provide successful resolution to IRS and Colorado Department of Revenue issues for more than 90 clients in the fall of 2018. The LITC recently had eight offers in compromise accepted by the IRS.  These settlements with the IRS reduced the LITC clients’ tax liabilities by more than $250,000. More from the Low Income Taxpayer Clinic.


    Mediation Practicum

    Students in DU’s Mediation Practicum are mediating small claims disputes in both Denver County Court and Adams County Courts and facilitate settlements between pro-se landlords and tenants. More from the Mediation Practicum.


    Clinical Programs Faculty Highlights

    Associate Professor Patience Crowder
    Community Economic Development Clinic
    Impact Transaction: Lawyering for the Public Good through Collective Impact Agreements, 49 INDIANA L. REV. 621 (2016) (reprinted in 48 ELR 10681, 2018).

    Professor Christopher Lasch
    Criminal Defense Clinic
    The Battle over “Sanctuary Policies” Illuminates the Clash of Values Underlying Today’s Immigration Policy Debates, 52 ABA SEC. INT’L LAW YEAR IN REVIEW 347 (2018).

    Associate Professor Kevin Lynch
    Environmental Law Clinic  
    A Fracking Mess: Just Compensation for Regulatory Takings of Oil and Gas Property Rights, 43 COLUM. J. OF ENVTL. L. 335 (2018).

    More Clinical Faculty Highlights

  • Spring 2018

    Student Attorneys Score Big Wins for Clients, Community Economic Development Clinic awarded grant, and more

    A Rise in Rankings for Denver Law

    The University of Denver Sturm College of Law Clinical Programs moved up five spots in the U.S. News & World Report 2018–2019 law school rankings and is now ranked 8th in the country. This marks the eighth consecutive year that the clinical programs have been ranked among the top 20 in the nation.


    DU Students Score Big Win in Wage-Theft Case

    Students in the Civil Litigation Clinic won $15,000 on behalf of four workers whose employer admitted to owing them money but refused to pay. More from the Civil Litigation Clinic.

    wage theft case clients

     


    Environmental Law Clinic Student Reflection

    Student Attorney Brandy Noriega argued a lawsuit challenging the Colorado Oil & Gas Conservation Commission’s well development directly adjacent to ballfields and playgrounds. More from the Environmental Law Clinic.

    well development lawsuit

     


    Fulbright Scholar Works for Juvenile Justice in Ghana

    Professor Walker Sterling continued her work as a consultant for the Children's Act Revision Project of the Ministry of Gender, Children, and Social Welfare and the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF). More from the Criminal Defense Clinic.

    robin walker sterling

     


    Clinic Receives Grant for Local Redevelopment Legal Assistance

    The Community Economic Development (CED) Clinic was awarded a three-year grant totaling $150,000 from the Colorado Lawyer Trust Account Foundation (COLTAF). The grant will be used to support the CED Clinic’s work in three new and critically important areas: conducting rural entrepreneurship workshops, supporting creators of technology advancing social justice, and conducting workplace “Know Your Rights” trainings to help prepare small businesses for encounters with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).  The COLTAF award is a grant of restricted funds designated exclusively for community redevelopment legal assistance.

    The CED Clinic is a year-long clinic that teaches transactional practice skills to students through the representation of nonprofit corporations, community-based associations and enterprises, small businesses, and artists.  The award is recognition of the outstanding, high quality, and client-centered work the student attorneys in the CED Clinic have provided since the clinic began representing clients in Fall 2011.  


    First LLM Fellow Graduates

    Congratulations to Tim Estep, Casey Faucon, Nicole Godfrey, and Rachel Moran, the first graduates of Denver Law’s Clinical Teaching LLM Program! It’s hard to believe three years have passed since the fellows began the program at DU. During that time, they’ve developed into skilled clinical teachers who have greatly enriched our program. We will miss them enormously but are excited to see them embark on this next chapter of their careers. Tim Estep will continue his work in public interest environmental law; Casey Faucon will be an Assistant Professor and Director of the Entrepreneurship and Nonprofit Clinic at the University of Alabama School of Law; Nicole Godfrey will be a Visiting Assistant Professor in Denver Law’s Civil Rights Clinic, and Rachel Moran will be an Assistant Professor in the at the University of St. Thomas School of Law where she will be launching a new criminal & juvenile defense clinic.

    clinic fellows

     


    Legal Externship Program Continues to Grow

    Students in Denver Law’s Legal Externship Program contributed more than 52,000 hours of work in the field during the Fall 2017 and Spring 2018 semesters. These two semesters alone placed students in over 275 externships. More from the Legal Externship Program.


    Associate Professor Patience Crowder
    Community Economic Development Clinic 
    Contracting for Complexity: Collective Impact Agreements in Community Economic Development,” 26(1) Journal of Affordable Housing & Community Development Law 63 (Symposium) (2017).  Read more.

    Professor Tamara Kuennen
    Civil Litigation Clinic
    Intimate Partner Violence and Men’s Professional Sports” (with Chelsea Augelli), __ Sports & Entertainment L.J. __ (forthcoming 2018).

    Associate Professor Christopher Lasch
    Criminal Defense Clinic
    A Common-Law Privilege to Protect State and Local Courts During the Crimmigration Crisis,” 127 Yale L.J. F. 410 (2017). Read more.

    Ronald V. Yegge Clinical Director and Professor Laura Rovner
    Civil Rights Clinic 
    On Litigating Constitutional Challenges to the Federal Supermax: Improving Conditions and Shining a Light,” 95 Denver U. L. Rev. 457 (2018). Read more.

    Assistant Professor Lindsey Webb
    Civil Rights Clinic  
    Legal Consciousness as Race Consciousness: Expansion of the Fourth Amendment Seizure Analysis Through Objective Knowledge of Police Impunity,” 48 Seton Hall L. Rev. 403 (2018). Read more.


    More Clinical Faculty Highlights.

  • Fall 2017

    Denver Law Clinical Programs ranked No. 13, marking the seventh consecutive year that they have been ranked among the top 20 in the U.S.

    The 2017–2018 U.S. News & World Report law school rankings placed the University of Denver Sturm College of Law's Clinical Program 13th, marking the seventh consecutive year that the clinical programs have been ranked among the top 20 in the U.S. Denver Law has also been recognized as the nation's 9th best school for practical training by the National Jurist.


    Environmental Law Clinic Argues Against Oil & Gas Developer

    On October 12, 2017, Environmental Law Clinic (ELC) students Travis Parker and Erica Montague, both second-year students, argued in Denver City and County District Court on behalf of a neighborhood group in Greeley, Colorado claiming that a state agency was failing to follow its regulations when approving large oil and gas development projects in residential communities.

    The lawsuit, Neighbors Affected by Triple Creek v. Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, is the first challenge to an approval of an oil and gas development subject to the Commission’s new Large Urban Mitigation Area regulations. Over the 11 months following the filing of the Neighbors’ complaint, ELC student attorneys filed briefs and successfully prevented the Commission and Industry-Intervenors from relying on documents outside of the administrative record to provide a post-hoc rationalization for the Commission’s approval of the 22-well development in the middle of multiple residential developments in western Greeley. The court's ruling on best management practices and mitigation measures represents the first successful challenge to the permitting of an oil and gas development in close proximity to a community in Colorado. Read More

    oil and gas litigation

     


    Fulbright Scholar in Ghana

    This year, Associate Professor Robin Walker Sterling is teaching and researching as a visiting professor and Fulbright Scholar at the University of Ghana School of Law in Accra. Walker Sterling is the first clinical professor at Denver Law to receive a Fulbright award. Walker Sterling is presenting a series of lectures as part of the Gender and the Law course, and is teaching a seminar on juvenile justice issues to Ph.D. students. “I am so lucky to work with this group of students, who are from all over the continent – I have students from Ghana, Rwanda, South Africa, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Teaching them has really helped me advance my thinking about juvenile justice, the tie between our country’s recent move away from rehabilitative principles and the erosion of informal social institutions, and the ways that juvenile system stakeholders can reify the commonsense notion that system-involved children should not be treated the same as system-involved adults. I hope they are learning from me as much as I am learning from them.” Read More

    fulbright scholar in ghana

     


    Civil Litigation Clinic Represents Asylum Seekers

    This fall, with the help of adjunct professor Theresa Vogel, the Civil Litigation Clinic has been able to represent individuals seeking Special Immigrant Juvenile Status and asylum as well as individuals in immigration detention seeking bond. At this halfway point in the semester, second- and third-year students litigated more than twenty cases in the Denver and Jefferson County Courts! As practitioners in these fields know, these types of cases involve discrete legal matters with no formal discovery. Thus the student attorneys have been able to represent these clients from start to finish, providing a unique educational opportunity that compliments the longer-lasting and more complex civil litigation opportunities provided by the law school’s Environmental Law and Civil Rights clinics. Read More 

    civil litigation student attorneys

     


    Legal Externship Program Continues to Grow

    In 2016-17, Denver Law's Legal Externship Program placed 418 students in more than 520 externships, and worked with over 310 supervisors. Summer enrollment alone increased by 50 percent. As always, our students engaged in a robust set of activities, growing their skills and impacting real people and real issues. Students wrote petitions of certiorari for Colorado Supreme Court justices, helped lawyers with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission prepare for a trial regarding religious discrimination for Muslim workers, crafted arguments for cutting edge litigation regarding the cannabis industry, and supported a state task force pursue legislation on mental health support for the criminal justice system, among many other experiences. Read More


    Reflections from the First Class of Clinic Fellows 

    In the summer of 2015, our first class of clinical graduate fellows matriculated in Denver Law’s Clinical Teaching Fellowship LLM program. Clinical Fellows are enrolled in a three-year program during which they are in residence at one of the Denver Law’s in-house clinics, where they learn clinical supervision, classroom teaching, and have the opportunity to develop as scholars. Two and a half years later, our Fellows are now in the last year of their fellowships. During that time, they’ve grown into thoughtful teachers, emerging scholars, and wonderful colleagues. While it will be difficult to "push them out of the nest," we’re looking forward to having them join the wonderful nationwide community of clinical teachers. Click here to read their reflections about their fellowships.

    clinic fellows

     


    Clinic Faculty Highlights

    Patience Crowder, "What’s Art Got to do With It?: A Rebellious Lawyer Mindset in Transactional Practice," 23 Clinical L. Rev. 53 (2016).

    Danielle Jefferis (Visiting Professor), “Institutionalizing Statelessness: Residency Rights in East Jerusalem,” East Jerusalem after Fifty Years of Israeli Occupation and Prospects for the Future (2017).

    Tamara Kuennen, "Domestic Violence Dynamics and the Impact of Domestic Violence on Children and Families," (Aug. 17, 2017, Denver CO) (with Amy Pohl).

    Chris Lasch, Jose Sabino Espino-Paez v. State of Colorado. Prof. Lasch argued before the Colorado Supreme Court, raising the important question of what procedural protections the State of Colorado will afford to criminal defendants who are subjected to immigration removal proceedings on the basis of a guilty plea entered without the effective assistance of counsel.

    Kevin Lynch, "A Fracking Mess: Just Compensation for Regulatory Takings of Oil and Gas Property Rights," 43 Colum. J. of Envtl. L. (forthcoming 2018).

    Laura Rovner, “Everything Is at Stake if Norway Is Sentenced. In that Case, We Have Failed”: Solitary Confinement and the “Hard” Cases in the United States and Norway, 1 UCLA Crim. J. L. Rev. 77 (2017).

    Robin Walker Sterling, "Narrative and Justice Reinvestment," __ Denver L. Rev.___ (2017).

    Lindsey Webb, "Positive Disruption: Addressing Race in a Time of Social Change Through a Team-Taught, Reflection-Based, Outward-Looking Law School Seminar," (co-authored with Alexi Freeman), ___ U. Pa. J. Law & Social Change___ (forthcoming 2018).

    More Clinical Faculty Highlights

  • Past Newsletters

    Fall 2016 to Spring 2010