Dual degree students can work toward a law degree at Denver Law while also earning a master’s degree from another DU graduate program. Students can receive up to ten (10) semester hours of dual-degree credit credits toward their law degree, meaning that the law degree can be completed by taking 80 law credits. For Dual Degree Policies, please see the Student Handbook.

Being a dual degree student may entail taking classes in both semester and quarter formats concurrently, which carries some financial and financial aid implications.

Cost of Attendance and Loans

By default, financial aid awards for dual-degree law students are based on enrollment at the law school only. Therefore, if you are enrolled in semester and quarter classes, it’s important to fill out a Budget Adjustment Form to request that your financial aid reflect the classes you are taking in both programs.

When you submit the form, the Office of Financial Aid will modify your cost of attendance and loans to reflect the tuition charges that you will be incurring as you pursue dual degrees.

Billing and Refunds

Since financial aid typically disburses on the semester schedule for all dual degree students, you may receive a credit refund in one term that you need to use to cover charges in a future term.

If you would like help budgeting for your dual degree program, we recommend that you set up an appointment with the Office of Financial Management.

Denver Law Scholarships

If you have a scholarship from Denver Law, you are eligible to have the scholarship renewed for 6 semesters if you are a day student, 8 semesters if you are an evening student, or for up to 80 credits if you have a full-tuition scholarship, provided that you meet all other eligibility requirements.

We recommend that you meet with the Office of Financial Management to make sure that you are maximizing your scholarship, especially if you will be taking a reduced course load in one or more semesters.

Extenuating Circumstances
In rare circumstances, students may appeal, in writing, to the Scholarship Committee to have their scholarship eligibility extended beyond the 6 or 8 semester limit.

If approved, the appeal would not increase the total amount of the scholarship but would allow a student to receive the scholarship amount over an additional semester or semesters.