Academic Advising

Second and Third Years

 

As you move into your second and third (and for evening students, your fourth) years of law school, though some requirements for graduation remain, you begin to choose which classes to take. These choices shape your JD journey. We suggest two guides as you make your selections:

1. THINK ABOUT THE SCOPE OF YOUR LEGAL EDUCATION
Try to balance two aims. First, you should round out your legal education. Your first year courses covered foundational areas of law, ones “every lawyer ought to know.” They are also tested on the bar exam. Continue to take more of these courses. Examples of courses you might consider taking are Family Law, Criminal Procedure, Corporations, Commercial Law Survey and Trusts & Estates. Second, you now get the chance to begin to specialize in areas of the law in which you might like to practice. To assist you, Denver Law offers Certificate programs in six areas of the law, and we have constructed over a dozen Pathways in other areas. See more information here.

2. TAKE ADVANTAGE OF DENVER LAW’S EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING CURRICULUM
We encourage you to quickly engage with Denver Law’s robust experiential learning curriculum. Do this in three ways. One, the Externship Program places students in more than 400 externships per year, allowing students to work in the field under the supervision of an attorney with support from Externship faculty. Many students do their first Externship during the summer following their 1L year. Two, Denver Law’s Clinical Programs provide students the opportunity to learn and practice lawyering skills by representing real world clients. Clinics are semester- or year-long and are open to 2Ls and 3Ls. Three, many courses offered to second- and third-year students incorporate skills and professional identity formation elements into the traditional doctrinal curriculum. In the Class Schedules, these courses are identified in the “EA” column.

THREE ADDITIONAL CLASSES ARE REQUIRED TO GRADUATE
During your second and third years, you must take Administrative Law, Evidence and Legal Profession. The pathways you pursue suggest when to take these courses. For example, if you are pursuing a career in litigation, or if you want to be in one of the clinics involving litigation, you will want to take Evidence and Legal Profession early on. Administrative Law is important for a student interested in environmental and natural resources law, business law, intellectual property law and healthcare law.

SEE A COMPLETE LIST OF ALL REQUIREMENTS TO EARN THE JD HERE

 

Sturm College of Law
University of Denver
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Denver, CO 80208

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